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I'm here to help people, the animals, and Mother Earth. We should all help each other.....especially when you know someone is not doing so well. No one is perfect, even if they sometimes claim to be. A lot of times, people are just wearing a mask because they don't want to be hurt. They really want to change, but they don't know how. That's another reason that I'm here...to help those who wish to change, do exactly that....in the most positive way. Please have a look at all of the topics we cover here. Hopefully, you will find them to be helpful. If there is anything that you wish to add, please go under the CONTACT section and let me know. We are here to help. Namaste.

Nature’s 9 Most Powerful Medicinal Plants and the Science Behind Them

HEALTHLINE.COM Tiffany La Forge

We scoured through histories of herbal studies for you
Today, we live in a time when manufactured medicines and prescriptions prevail, but do they have to be the only approach to healing?

Even with all of these engineered options at our fingertips, many people find themselves turning back to the medicinal plants that started it all: Herbal remedies that have the ability to heal and boost physical and mental well-being.

In fact, at the beginning of the 21st century, 11 percentTrusted Source of the 252 drugs considered “basic and essential” by the World Health Organization were “exclusively of flowering plant origin.” Drugs like codeine, quinine, and morphine all contain plant-derived ingredients.

While these manufactured drugs have certainly become paramount in our lives, it can be comforting to know that the power of nature is on our side, and these herbal choices are available to complement our health practices.

But the extent of the power they hold is also still being explored. These alternatives aren’t cure-alls, and they aren’t perfect. Many carry the same risks and side effects as manufactured medicines. Many of them are sold with unfounded promises.

However, many herbs and teas offer harmless subtle ways to improve your health. Pay attention to what the evidence says about each herb’s effectiveness as well as potential interactions or safety issues. Avoid using herbs for infants and children and for those who are pregnant and breastfeeding. Most herbs haven’t been tested for safety for those who are vulnerable, and trying herbs isn’t worth the risk.

With this cautionary tale in mind, choosing the right plant can seem difficult to someone who simply wants to feel better without taking medication. That’s why, with the help of specialist Debra Rose Wilson, we’re looking at the most effective and therapeutic plants — which have strong scientific evidence to support their safe use.

Making decisions about herbs along with more traditional medicinal approaches is something you and your healthcare practitioner can address together. At times, Wilson notes, ingesting the plants can have even less risk than taking concentrated, manufactured supplements, as there’s more risk of contamination of the product with the manufacture processes. It’s a wonderful way to experience their effects and the satisfaction of growing them yourself. Herbs can also be a way to add a needed nutrient.

However, both plants and supplements, which aren’t regulated by the Food and Drug Administration for safety or quality, can have questionable dosage and might have a risk of contamination. Keep this in mind before choosing supplements from the shelf.

If you’d like to add some medicinal plants to your wellness regimen, Wilson sifted through the latest studies and provides her own ratings system for our list.

These plants have the most numerous high-quality studies and are the safer choices among herbal remedies. She’s marked “0” as unsafe with no research, and “5” as completely safe with ample research. Many of these plants are somewhere between 3 and 4, according to Wilson.

We hope this guide will act as a starting point to those who wish to integrate herbal remedies into their lives and arrive armed with knowledge. As always, speak with your doctor before starting any new health treatment.

Gingko


Rating
Safety: 3/5

Evidence: 3.5/5

As one of the oldest tree species, gingko is also one of the oldest homeopathic plants and a key herb in Chinese medicine. The leaves are used to create capsules, tablets, and extracts, and when dried, can be consumed as a tea.

It’s perhaps best-known for its ability to boost brain health. Studies say that gingko can treat patients with mild to moderate dementiaTrusted Source, and can slow cognition decline in dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

Recent research is looking into a component that can help diabetes, and there continue to be more studies, including an animal study that says it might influence bone healing.

INTERESTING FACT
The gingko tree is considered a living fossil, with fossils dating from 270 million years ago. These trees can live up to 3,000 years.

Gingko could be beneficial for:
dementia
Alzheimer’s disease
eye health
inflammation
diabetes
bone healing
anxiety
depression
Things to consider
Long-term use may increase chance of thyroid and liver cancer, which has been seen in rats.
It’s known to be hard on the liver, so liver enzymes may need to be monitored.
It can interact with blood thinners.
Gingko seeds are poisonous if ingested.
Side effects can include headache, upset stomach, dizziness, and allergic reaction.
Gingko use needs to be discussed with your doctor because of numerous drug interactions.
Turmeric
Rating
Safety: used as an herb: 5/5; used as a supplement: 4/5

Evidence: 3/5

With its brilliant orange hue, it’s impossible to miss a bottle of turmeric sitting on a spice shelf. Originating in India, turmeric is believed to have anticancer properties and can prevent DNA mutations.

As an anti-inflammatory, it can be taken as

READ MORE HERE:  https://www.healthline.com/health/most-powerful-medicinal-plants

FROM ME TO YOU

Haunted New Orleans: 5 horrifying stories and legends

The Myrtles Plantation (Source: myrtlesplantation.com)
The Myrtles Plantation (Source: myrtlesplantation.com)

NEW ORLEANS (WVUE) – New Orleans is a city with a rich and dark history. Many believe that the city is among the most haunted in the United States. Locals say there is a reason behind the reported haunting.

“We’ve had a great concentration of death in a relatively small period of time in a relatively small area,” said Sydney Smith, a guide with Haunted History Tours. “They say violent death a strong emotion. It contributes to hauntings and paranormal activity – and we’ve had no shortage of that here.”

Legends of grisly murders, plundering pirates, voodoo spirits and restless wanderers run rampant across the city. Here are a few of the reported hauntings and the legends behind them.

1. LaLaurie Mansion

Many have heard the tale of Madame LaLaurie and her torture chamber on Royal Street.

Born in New Orleans, the prominent Delphine LaLaurie was married three times over the course of her life.

The origin of the ghostly tale begins in 1832 when Dr. Louis LaLaurie and Delphine moved to a Creole mansion in the French Quarter. Known for their wealth and prominence, the house was attended to by dozens of slaves.

Following a fire in the mansion’s kitchen, the horrors of the home were revealed. Legend has it that behind a barred door in the attic was a torture chamber for those enslaved. Many stories detail the cruelty involved; men and women chained to the walls, children shut inside cages and body parts strewn across the floor.

LaLaurie later fled to Paris, believed to be run from town by an outraged mob.

Tales of lingering are said to haunt the grounds. Others say the ghost of Delphine LaLaurie herself haunts the mansion.

2. St. Louis Cemetery No. 1

Established by the Spanish in 1789, many of the city’s early occupants and infamous personalities are interred here, including Marie Laveau. It has also been named the ‘Most Haunted Cemetery in the United States.’

Pirates, aristocrats, politicians, killers, artists and the Queen of Voodoo are interred on the grounds. With over so many dead interred, it’s no wonder the cemetery has heard its fair share of ghost stories.

Phantom figures and yellow fever victims reportedly stalk the rows of crypts. However, the most famous spirit believed to roam the grounds is that of Marie Laveau, New Orleans’ Queen of Voodoo. Some believe that Laveau materializes annually of St. John’s Eve (June 23) to lead the voodoo faithful in worship.

3. The Myrtles Mansion

Although not in New Orleans, the Myrtles Plantation is just a short day trip from the city.

The antebellum plantation sits in St. Francisville, Louisiana. It has been touted as one of “America’s Most Haunted Homes.” The home was built in 1796. Since it was erected, it has been the home to many prominent figures.

It’s said to be haunted by over a dozen spirits and ghosts. Some claim the home has seen ten murders on the grounds. However, historical records show just one. In the 1800s, William Winter was shot and killed on the porch of the home. His killer is unknown.

Aside from Winter, numerous other figures reportedly haunt the grounds. The home is said to be built on an Indian burial ground. Other say it’s haunted the ghosts of prior slaves and young children.

Two particularly frightening stories stem from photographs showing alleged spirits and ghosts.

According to the plantation’s website, a young slave girl (known as Chloe) was photographed on the grounds of the plantation. Another photo depicts what appears to be a young, antebellum girl staring out of a window behind two visitors (photos in slideshow above).

4. Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop Bar

A small tavern located on the corner of Bourbon and St. Philip, it is one of the oldest surviving buildings in New Orleans.

Built sometime between 1722 and 1732, Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop Bar is reputed to be the oldest structure used as a bar in the United States.

From 1772 and 1791, the property was believed to have been used by Jean and Pierre Lafitte. It was used as a New Orleans base for their Barataria smuggling operations, according to legend.

A French-American pirate and privateer, Jean Lafitte plundered the waters of the Gulf of Mexico. Some stories claim the buccaneer’s treasure is buried in the building’s bricks. A fireplace grate in the downstairs of the bar is rumored to be the resting place of some of the plunder. Some say a pair of ghostly red eyes can be seen staring from the grate.

Other legends say the ghost of a pirate guarding the treasure haunts the bar. Some also say the spirit of Jean Lafitte roams the tavern.

5. Hotel Monteleone

Built in 1886, the Beaux Arts-style Hotel Monteleone in the French Quarter is known for its rotating Carousel Piano Bar and Lounge.

It’s also known as one of
READ MORE HERE: https://www.fox8live.com/story/27174205/haunted-new-orleans-5-horrifying-stories-and-legends/